HERE'S HARVEY!        He's a Great Ol' Guy

HARVEY THE GILA MONSTER IS CHILDREN'S POPULAR HERO

 Harvey the Gila Monster is a hit! Children's musician Persephone has converted "America's Aztec Lizard" into a whimsical singing character. You'll hear the "unique personality," words and music of Harvey on Persephone's recording "Kid at Heart," available on cassette tape and compact disc.

"Everybody loves the song," Persephone says of Harvey the Gila Monster. "People always want to hear it-at schools, in homes, at my public appearances. They all love Harvey."


HARVEY'S HISTORY

Persephone created the character Harvey the Gila Monster for music students at a Jewish pre-school in Scottsdale, Arizona. To her original tune, she added a special twist to the age-old Jewish song "Hava Nagila." Accompanied by Persephone's piano and a bouzouki (a Greek stringed instrument), this lively and playful song celebrates the Gila Monster as a likeable guy with "good personality." "I love animals and follow a live-and-let-live philosophy of mutual respect," Persephone says. Her message to children is: Don't judge the Gila Monster just because he might look scary. He won't bite you unless you scare him. As her lyrics say: "Have a Gila Monster as your friend." Look for Harvey in concert with Persephone. You can't miss him-he'll have a turned-up tail, beaded black-and-orange skin, and may even be wearing a tuxedo!
Harvey loves to have fun and play with you! You can e-mail Harvey at harvey@demetermusic.com.

FUN FACTS ON GILA MONSTERS:
Pronounced HEEL-a, this so-called monster has a poisonous bite but is otherwise a gentle soul. It is the largest lizard native to the U.S. and is recognizable by its distinctive beaded color pattern. Unlike snakes, it sheds its armor-like skin in patches, not whole. Most adults grow to between 14 and 16 inches and will weigh between a pound and a pound and a half. Gila Monsters are found primarily in the Sonoran desert of Arizona and Northwestern Mexico. (From GILA MONSTER-Facts and Folklore of America's Aztec Lizard by David E. Brown and Neil B. Carmony)